Final Days on Seinfeld Set by David Kennerly

Final Days on Seinfeld Set by David Kennerly

Jerry Seinfeld and the other actors on set in the final days of shooting his hit TV show “Seinfeld”, April 3, 1998 in Studio City, California.

David Hume Kennerly (b. 1947, Roseburg, Oregon) has photographed eight wars, has photographed every American president since Richard Nixon, and has traveled to dozens of countries in the last 45 years. During his early career in Portland he photographed major personalities including Miles Davis, Igor Stravinsky, Sen. Robert F. Kennedy, The Rolling Stones, and The Supremes. Kennerly moved to Los Angeles in the fall of 1967 as a staff photographer for UPI and took some of the last photos of Sen. Robert Kennedy at the Ambassador Hotel. In 1969 Kennerly moved to New York for UPI where among many other assignments he photographed the Amazing Mets win the World Series. At age 23 he took his first ride on Air Force One with President Nixon as a member of the traveling press pool. At 25, he won the 1972 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography for his previous year’s work that included photos of the Vietnam, Cambodia, and India-Pakistan Wars, and the Ali-Frazier fight in Madison Square Garden. In 1976 he was awarded two first prizes in the World Press photo contest for pictures from the final days of Cambodia. Kennerly returned to the United States in the summer of 1973 working for Time, during the midst of the Watergate crisis. His historic photo of Nixon’s wave goodbye, taken when Kennerly was just 27 years old, is one of the dozens of his images that have helped define American photojournalism. Nixon’s successor, President Gerald Ford, asked Kennerly to serve as his White House Photographer, a role that resulted in some of the most personal political pictures of his career. After the White House, Kennerly went back on contract for Time Magazine, where he covered some of the biggest stories of the 1970s and 1980s around the world. Kennerly has photographed more than 35 covers for Time and Newsweek, and covered assignments in over 130 countries. He was named, “One of the Most 100 Most Important People in Photography” by American Photo Magazine.